Charcoal grilling might be adding carcinogens to your meat. Why doesn’t that bother you?

The first part of this article was really interesting; it was a good hook so is the rest but well it was cool to see people doing signs in the 18th and 19th century.

Puff the Mutant Dragon

In the early 1770s London doctor Percival Pott noticed something strange about the chimneysweeps in his town: an unusually high percentage of them had a rare form of cancer.

Most chimneysweeps at that time were boys under the age of fifteen because kids were better at squeezing into narrow chimneys. Orphans and street kids, most of them, with not much family to care what happened to them either way. Pott found that by the time they hit their twenties and thirties they were unusually likely to get cancer of the scrotum. Outside of chimneysweeps scrotal cancer was pretty rare. But among chimneysweeps — much more common. He remembered one patient in particular, a young man aged 28 with a tumor the size of your hand growing out of his balls.

The sore [occupied] the whole of the left side of the scrotum and the inner angle of the thigh…

Unfortunately…

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On the World Around Us: A Sampling of Science Blogs

The WordPress.com Blog

We love writers who are constantly curious — asking questions, digging deeper, and always learning about the world around us. Here are some science bloggers to add to your reading list:

The Renaissance Mathematicus

The self-proclaimed “aging freak” at Renaissance Mathematicus writes about the history, philosophy, and mythology of science in the early modern period (roughly the fifteeth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries) — and focuses on the mythology of science in particular, exposing and exploding these myths. For a taste, consider the recentposts on Neil deGrasse Tyson’s remake of Carl Sagan’s Cosmos.

Why? Because Science.

The blogchild of witty science writer Thea Beckman, Why — Because Science is a refreshing space for science writing. Thea, who has a background in atmospheric science, injects humor and personality in her posts — take a look at “The Sky Is Only Sometimes Blue,” in which she illustrates a discussion of light, energy and sound…

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